Radiology Nurse Wolflake IN 46796

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Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

Computed Tomography (CT)

Breast Imaging

Diagnostic X-ray

Mammography

Angiography

Ultrasound

Fluoroscopy

Nuclear Medicine and PET

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

Interventional Radiology

Oncology Radiology

Neuroradiology

Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

Diagnostic Radiology

Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

Interventional Radiology

From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

Attending patient consultations

Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

Writing pre-procedure orders

Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

Performing follow-up visits

Education

Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

Advanced Radiation Physics

Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

Case Studies in Medical Imaging

Radiology Management

Advanced Imaging Modalities

Specialty Certification

Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

CT and MRI, including PET

Interventional Radiology

Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

Resources for Radiology Nurses

The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

Salary Expectations

Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

Surrounding Areas In Indiana

  • Radiology Nurse Milltown IN 47145
  • Radiology Nurse Larwill IN 46764
  • Radiology Nurse Pine Village IN 47975
  • Radiology Nurse Pershing IN 47370
  • Radiology Nurse Yoder IN 46798
  • Radiology Nurse Knightstown IN 46148
  • Radiology Nurse Grissom Afb IN 46971
  • Radiology Nurse Kouts IN 46347
  • Radiology Nurse Chrisney IN 47611
  • Radiology Nurse Hayden IN 47245
  • Wolflake Information

    [ssyelp location="Wolflake IN" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Woodburn IN 46797

    Home > Radiology Nurse Indiana

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Indiana

  • Radiology Nurse Alexandria IN 46001
  • Radiology Nurse Parker City IN 47368
  • Radiology Nurse East Chicago IN 46312
  • Radiology Nurse Jeffersonville IN 47130
  • Radiology Nurse Bringhurst IN 46913
  • Radiology Nurse Morgantown IN 46160
  • Radiology Nurse Clayton IN 46118
  • Radiology Nurse Prairie Creek IN 47869
  • Radiology Nurse Mount Summit IN 47361
  • Radiology Nurse Ingalls IN 46048
  • Woodburn Information

    [ssyelp location="Woodburn IN" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Worthington IN 47471

    Home > Radiology Nurse Indiana

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Indiana

  • Radiology Nurse Branchville IN 47514
  • Radiology Nurse Waveland IN 47989
  • Radiology Nurse Francesville IN 47946
  • Radiology Nurse Versailles IN 47042
  • Radiology Nurse Uniondale IN 46791
  • Radiology Nurse West Lafayette IN 47906
  • Radiology Nurse Hamlet IN 46532
  • Radiology Nurse Goldsmith IN 46045
  • Radiology Nurse Waynetown IN 47990
  • Radiology Nurse Logansport IN 46947
  • Worthington Information

    [ssyelp location="Worthington IN" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Winamac IN 46996

    Home > Radiology Nurse Indiana

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Indiana

  • Radiology Nurse Pierceton IN 46562
  • Radiology Nurse Redkey IN 47373
  • Radiology Nurse Centerville IN 47330
  • Radiology Nurse Gentryville IN 47537
  • Radiology Nurse Summitville IN 46070
  • Radiology Nurse Shipshewana IN 46565
  • Radiology Nurse Hartford City IN 47348
  • Radiology Nurse Inglefield IN 47618
  • Radiology Nurse Commiskey IN 47227
  • Radiology Nurse Owensburg IN 47453
  • Winamac Information

    [ssyelp location="Winamac IN" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Wyatt IN 46595

    Home > Radiology Nurse Indiana

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Indiana

  • Radiology Nurse Wheatfield IN 46392
  • Radiology Nurse Underwood IN 47177
  • Radiology Nurse Staunton IN 47881
  • Radiology Nurse Advance IN 46102
  • Radiology Nurse Osgood IN 47037
  • Radiology Nurse Hillsdale IN 47854
  • Radiology Nurse Mongo IN 46771
  • Radiology Nurse Saint Anthony IN 47575
  • Radiology Nurse Lebanon IN 46052
  • Radiology Nurse Huntingburg IN 47542
  • Wyatt Information

    [ssyelp location="Wyatt IN" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Winchester IN 47394

    Home > Radiology Nurse Indiana

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Indiana

  • Radiology Nurse Whiteland IN 46184
  • Radiology Nurse Walton IN 46994
  • Radiology Nurse Evanston IN 47531
  • Radiology Nurse Daleville IN 47334
  • Radiology Nurse Nashville IN 47448
  • Radiology Nurse Laurel IN 47024
  • Radiology Nurse Florence IN 47020
  • Radiology Nurse Galveston IN 46932
  • Radiology Nurse Hemlock IN 46937
  • Radiology Nurse Glenwood IN 46133
  • Winchester Information

    [ssyelp location="Winchester IN" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Yeoman IN 47997

    Home > Radiology Nurse Indiana

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Indiana

  • Radiology Nurse Hagerstown IN 47346
  • Radiology Nurse Springville IN 47462
  • Radiology Nurse Hanover IN 47243
  • Radiology Nurse Palmyra IN 47164
  • Radiology Nurse Deedsville IN 46921
  • Radiology Nurse Fairland IN 46126
  • Radiology Nurse Delphi IN 46923
  • Radiology Nurse Jonesboro IN 46938
  • Radiology Nurse Petroleum IN 46778
  • Radiology Nurse Francisco IN 47649
  • Yeoman Information

    [ssyelp location="Yeoman IN" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Windfall IN 46076

    Home > Radiology Nurse Indiana

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Indiana

  • Radiology Nurse State Line IN 47982
  • Radiology Nurse Mackey IN 47654
  • Radiology Nurse Brook IN 47922
  • Radiology Nurse Newport IN 47966
  • Radiology Nurse Young America IN 46998
  • Radiology Nurse Somerset IN 46984
  • Radiology Nurse Oolitic IN 47451
  • Radiology Nurse Kirklin IN 46050
  • Radiology Nurse Millhousen IN 47261
  • Radiology Nurse Auburn IN 46706
  • Windfall Information

    [ssyelp location="Windfall IN" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Yoder IN 46798

    Home > Radiology Nurse Indiana

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Indiana

  • Radiology Nurse New Waverly IN 46961
  • Radiology Nurse Reelsville IN 46171
  • Radiology Nurse Bringhurst IN 46913
  • Radiology Nurse Francesville IN 47946
  • Radiology Nurse Lawrenceburg IN 47025
  • Radiology Nurse Solsberry IN 47459
  • Radiology Nurse Corunna IN 46730
  • Radiology Nurse Rushville IN 46173
  • Radiology Nurse Claypool IN 46510
  • Radiology Nurse Holton IN 47023
  • Yoder Information

    [ssyelp location="Yoder IN" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Wingate IN 47994

    Home > Radiology Nurse Indiana

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Indiana

  • Radiology Nurse Paxton IN 47865
  • Radiology Nurse Milltown IN 47145
  • Radiology Nurse Seymour IN 47274
  • Radiology Nurse Huntingburg IN 47542
  • Radiology Nurse Vallonia IN 47281
  • Radiology Nurse Noblesville IN 46060
  • Radiology Nurse Rolling Prairie IN 46371
  • Radiology Nurse Francesville IN 47946
  • Radiology Nurse Rushville IN 46173
  • Radiology Nurse Hoagland IN 46745
  • Wingate Information

    [ssyelp location="Wingate IN" term="schools" limit="10"]