Radiology Nurse Worden MT 59088

Home > Radiology Nurse Montana

Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

Computed Tomography (CT)

Breast Imaging

Diagnostic X-ray

Mammography

Angiography

Ultrasound

Fluoroscopy

Nuclear Medicine and PET

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

Interventional Radiology

Oncology Radiology

Neuroradiology

Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

Diagnostic Radiology

Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

Interventional Radiology

From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

Attending patient consultations

Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

Writing pre-procedure orders

Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

Performing follow-up visits

Education

Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

Advanced Radiation Physics

Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

Case Studies in Medical Imaging

Radiology Management

Advanced Imaging Modalities

Specialty Certification

Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

CT and MRI, including PET

Interventional Radiology

Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

Resources for Radiology Nurses

The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

Salary Expectations

Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

Surrounding Areas In Montana

  • Radiology Nurse Grantsdale MT 59835
  • Radiology Nurse Melrose MT 59743
  • Radiology Nurse Willard MT 59354
  • Radiology Nurse Coffee Creek MT 59424
  • Radiology Nurse Divide MT 59727
  • Radiology Nurse Lima MT 59739
  • Radiology Nurse Lothair MT 59461
  • Radiology Nurse Fromberg MT 59029
  • Radiology Nurse Marion MT 59925
  • Radiology Nurse Helmville MT 59843
  • Worden Information

    [ssyelp location="Worden MT" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Wyola MT 59089

    Home > Radiology Nurse Montana

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Montana

  • Radiology Nurse Fort Peck MT 59223
  • Radiology Nurse Sand Springs MT 59077
  • Radiology Nurse Loma MT 59460
  • Radiology Nurse Volborg MT 59351
  • Radiology Nurse Belfry MT 59008
  • Radiology Nurse Cooke City MT 59020
  • Radiology Nurse Jordan MT 59337
  • Radiology Nurse Pompeys Pillar MT 59064
  • Radiology Nurse Marion MT 59925
  • Radiology Nurse Clyde Park MT 59018
  • Wyola Information

    [ssyelp location="Wyola MT" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Yellowtail MT 59035

    Home > Radiology Nurse Montana

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Montana

  • Radiology Nurse Toston MT 59643
  • Radiology Nurse Otter MT 59062
  • Radiology Nurse Rollins MT 59931
  • Radiology Nurse Noxon MT 59853
  • Radiology Nurse De Borgia MT 59830
  • Radiology Nurse Ringling MT 59642
  • Radiology Nurse Polaris MT 59746
  • Radiology Nurse Bighorn MT 59010
  • Radiology Nurse Scobey MT 59263
  • Radiology Nurse Hobson MT 59452
  • Yellowtail Information

    [ssyelp location="Yellowtail MT" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Zortman MT 59546

    Home > Radiology Nurse Montana

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Montana

  • Radiology Nurse Bearcreek MT 59007
  • Radiology Nurse Three Forks MT 59752
  • Radiology Nurse Kalispell MT 59901
  • Radiology Nurse Raynesford MT 59469
  • Radiology Nurse Cascade MT 59421
  • Radiology Nurse Fort Benton MT 59442
  • Radiology Nurse Polaris MT 59746
  • Radiology Nurse Edgar MT 59026
  • Radiology Nurse Lonepine MT 59848
  • Radiology Nurse Wolf Point MT 59201
  • Zortman Information

    [ssyelp location="Zortman MT" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Zurich MT 59547

    Home > Radiology Nurse Montana

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Montana

  • Radiology Nurse Sand Coulee MT 59472
  • Radiology Nurse Saco MT 59261
  • Radiology Nurse Mc Allister MT 59740
  • Radiology Nurse Coram MT 59913
  • Radiology Nurse Lolo MT 59847
  • Radiology Nurse Yellowtail MT 59035
  • Radiology Nurse Livingston MT 59047
  • Radiology Nurse Crow Agency MT 59022
  • Radiology Nurse Townsend MT 59644
  • Radiology Nurse Glen MT 59732
  • Zurich Information

    [ssyelp location="Zurich MT" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Wolf Creek MT 59648

    Home > Radiology Nurse Montana

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Montana

  • Radiology Nurse Worden MT 59088
  • Radiology Nurse Pinesdale MT 59841
  • Radiology Nurse Dutton MT 59433
  • Radiology Nurse Alberton MT 59820
  • Radiology Nurse Loring MT 59537
  • Radiology Nurse Raymond MT 59256
  • Radiology Nurse Buffalo MT 59418
  • Radiology Nurse Great Falls MT 59401
  • Radiology Nurse Charlo MT 59824
  • Radiology Nurse Hungry Horse MT 59919
  • Wolf Creek Information

    [ssyelp location="Wolf Creek MT" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Wolf Point MT 59201

    Home > Radiology Nurse Montana

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Montana

  • Radiology Nurse Sanders MT 59076
  • Radiology Nurse Polson MT 59860
  • Radiology Nurse Miles City MT 59301
  • Radiology Nurse Augusta MT 59410
  • Radiology Nurse Manhattan MT 59741
  • Radiology Nurse Lolo MT 59847
  • Radiology Nurse Roundup MT 59072
  • Radiology Nurse Edgar MT 59026
  • Radiology Nurse Lodge Grass MT 59050
  • Radiology Nurse Bigfork MT 59911
  • Wolf Point Information

    [ssyelp location="Wolf Point MT" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Wibaux MT 59353

    Home > Radiology Nurse Montana

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Montana

  • Radiology Nurse Florence MT 59833
  • Radiology Nurse Ekalaka MT 59324
  • Radiology Nurse Hot Springs MT 59845
  • Radiology Nurse Olney MT 59927
  • Radiology Nurse East Glacier Park MT 59434
  • Radiology Nurse Power MT 59468
  • Radiology Nurse Dodson MT 59524
  • Radiology Nurse Clyde Park MT 59018
  • Radiology Nurse Big Arm MT 59910
  • Radiology Nurse Warm Springs MT 59756
  • Wibaux Information

    [ssyelp location="Wibaux MT" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Willard MT 59354

    Home > Radiology Nurse Montana

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Montana

  • Radiology Nurse Jackson MT 59736
  • Radiology Nurse Stevensville MT 59870
  • Radiology Nurse Mcleod MT 58057
  • Radiology Nurse Carter MT 59420
  • Radiology Nurse Power MT 59468
  • Radiology Nurse Rudyard MT 59540
  • Radiology Nurse Hilger MT 59451
  • Radiology Nurse Corvallis MT 59828
  • Radiology Nurse Wolf Point MT 59201
  • Radiology Nurse Butte MT 59701
  • Willard Information

    [ssyelp location="Willard MT" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Willow Creek MT 59760

    Home > Radiology Nurse Montana

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Montana

  • Radiology Nurse Wibaux MT 59353
  • Radiology Nurse Virginia City MT 59755
  • Radiology Nurse Radersburg MT 59641
  • Radiology Nurse Polson MT 59860
  • Radiology Nurse Lodge Grass MT 59050
  • Radiology Nurse Belfry MT 59008
  • Radiology Nurse Fallon MT 59326
  • Radiology Nurse Sidney MT 59270
  • Radiology Nurse Livingston MT 59047
  • Radiology Nurse Harlem MT 59526
  • Willow Creek Information

    [ssyelp location="Willow Creek MT" term="schools" limit="10"]