Radiology Nurse Woodruff UT 84086

Home > Radiology Nurse Utah

Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

Computed Tomography (CT)

Breast Imaging

Diagnostic X-ray

Mammography

Angiography

Ultrasound

Fluoroscopy

Nuclear Medicine and PET

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

Interventional Radiology

Oncology Radiology

Neuroradiology

Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

Diagnostic Radiology

Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

Interventional Radiology

From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

Attending patient consultations

Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

Writing pre-procedure orders

Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

Performing follow-up visits

Education

Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

Advanced Radiation Physics

Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

Case Studies in Medical Imaging

Radiology Management

Advanced Imaging Modalities

Specialty Certification

Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

CT and MRI, including PET

Interventional Radiology

Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

Resources for Radiology Nurses

The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

Salary Expectations

Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

Surrounding Areas In Utah

  • Radiology Nurse Bryce UT 84764
  • Radiology Nurse Eden UT 84310
  • Radiology Nurse Lehi UT 84043
  • Radiology Nurse Delta UT 84624
  • Radiology Nurse Sandy UT 84070
  • Radiology Nurse Rockville UT 84763
  • Radiology Nurse Ferron UT 84523
  • Radiology Nurse La Sal UT 84530
  • Radiology Nurse Mount Pleasant UT 84647
  • Radiology Nurse Minersville UT 84752
  • Woodruff Information

    [ssyelp location="Woodruff UT" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Woods Cross UT 84087

    Home > Radiology Nurse Utah

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Utah

  • Radiology Nurse Pleasant View UT 81331
  • Radiology Nurse Sandy UT 84070
  • Radiology Nurse Minersville UT 84752
  • Radiology Nurse Fillmore UT 84631
  • Radiology Nurse Wendover UT 84083
  • Radiology Nurse Fruitland UT 84027
  • Radiology Nurse Peerless UT 59253
  • Radiology Nurse Alton UT 84710
  • Radiology Nurse Brian Head UT 84719
  • Radiology Nurse Clarkston UT 84305
  • Woods Cross Information

    [ssyelp location="Woods Cross UT" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Veyo UT 84782

    Home > Radiology Nurse Utah

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Utah

  • Radiology Nurse Wallsburg UT 84082
  • Radiology Nurse Hinckley UT 84635
  • Radiology Nurse Torrey UT 84775
  • Radiology Nurse Wendover UT 84083
  • Radiology Nurse Panguitch UT 84759
  • Radiology Nurse Orem UT 84057
  • Radiology Nurse Riverton UT 84065
  • Radiology Nurse Murdock UT 33938
  • Radiology Nurse Lyman UT 84749
  • Radiology Nurse Orderville UT 84758
  • Veyo Information

    [ssyelp location="Veyo UT" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Virgin UT 84779

    Home > Radiology Nurse Utah

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Utah

  • Radiology Nurse Kanarraville UT 84742
  • Radiology Nurse Meadow UT 84644
  • Radiology Nurse Collinston UT 84306
  • Radiology Nurse Portage UT 84331
  • Radiology Nurse Cache Junction UT 84304
  • Radiology Nurse Duchesne UT 84021
  • Radiology Nurse Myton UT 84052
  • Radiology Nurse Snowville UT 84336
  • Radiology Nurse Santa Clara UT 84765
  • Radiology Nurse Kamas UT 84036
  • Virgin Information

    [ssyelp location="Virgin UT" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Wales UT 84667

    Home > Radiology Nurse Utah

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Utah

  • Radiology Nurse Syracuse UT 84075
  • Radiology Nurse Deweyville UT 84309
  • Radiology Nurse Randolph UT 84064
  • Radiology Nurse Peoa UT 84061
  • Radiology Nurse Sunnyside UT 84539
  • Radiology Nurse Washington UT 84780
  • Radiology Nurse Mapleton UT 84664
  • Radiology Nurse Fountain Green UT 84632
  • Radiology Nurse Santaquin UT 84655
  • Radiology Nurse Central UT 84722
  • Wales Information

    [ssyelp location="Wales UT" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Wallsburg UT 84082

    Home > Radiology Nurse Utah

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Utah

  • Radiology Nurse Milford UT 84751
  • Radiology Nurse Boulder UT 84716
  • Radiology Nurse Mount Carmel UT 84755
  • Radiology Nurse Levan UT 84639
  • Radiology Nurse Midway UT 84049
  • Radiology Nurse Summit UT 84772
  • Radiology Nurse Santa Clara UT 84765
  • Radiology Nurse Meadow UT 84644
  • Radiology Nurse Aneth UT 84510
  • Radiology Nurse Riverside UT 84334
  • Wallsburg Information

    [ssyelp location="Wallsburg UT" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Washington UT 84780

    Home > Radiology Nurse Utah

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Utah

  • Radiology Nurse Sevier UT 84766
  • Radiology Nurse Fairview UT 84629
  • Radiology Nurse Brigham City UT 84302
  • Radiology Nurse Manila UT 84046
  • Radiology Nurse Logan UT 84321
  • Radiology Nurse Murdock UT 33938
  • Radiology Nurse Bear River City UT 84301
  • Radiology Nurse Fayette UT 84630
  • Radiology Nurse Midvale UT 84047
  • Radiology Nurse Magna UT 84044
  • Washington Information

    [ssyelp location="Washington UT" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Wellington UT 84542

    Home > Radiology Nurse Utah

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Utah

  • Radiology Nurse Salt Lake City UT 84101
  • Radiology Nurse Peerless UT 59253
  • Radiology Nurse Teasdale UT 84773
  • Radiology Nurse Roy UT 84067
  • Radiology Nurse Hanksville UT 84734
  • Radiology Nurse Eden UT 84310
  • Radiology Nurse Lindon UT 84042
  • Radiology Nurse Manila UT 84046
  • Radiology Nurse Modena UT 84753
  • Radiology Nurse Altonah UT 84002
  • Wellington Information

    [ssyelp location="Wellington UT" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Wellsville UT 84339

    Home > Radiology Nurse Utah

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Utah

  • Radiology Nurse Farmington UT 84025
  • Radiology Nurse Sigurd UT 84657
  • Radiology Nurse Vernal UT 84078
  • Radiology Nurse Hill Afb UT 84056
  • Radiology Nurse Corinne UT 84307
  • Radiology Nurse Kanab UT 84741
  • Radiology Nurse Mayfield UT 84643
  • Radiology Nurse Layton UT 84040
  • Radiology Nurse Kingston UT 84743
  • Radiology Nurse Heber UT 85928
  • Wellsville Information

    [ssyelp location="Wellsville UT" term="schools" limit="10"]

    Radiology Nurse Wendover UT 84083

    Home > Radiology Nurse Utah

    Radiology is a broad field that involves the use of radiologic medical technology to diagnose, manage, and treat a variety of conditions and diseases. A radiology nurse is involved with the assessment, planning, and care of patients who undergo diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic procedures. As such, a radiology nurse, often referred to as a radiological nurse, must have a high level of technical expertise and knowledge of radiologic science.

    Although radiology nurses are often hired at the RN level, it is the advanced practice radiology nurse who holds key positions within the field of radiology. Imaging and interventional radiologists often call upon nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists to serve as mid-level providers within radiology departments and laboratories.

    Radiology nurses often receive their clinical training and education in the following areas of radiologic science:

    Computed Tomography (CT)

    Breast Imaging

    Diagnostic X-ray

    Mammography

    Angiography

    Ultrasound

    Fluoroscopy

    Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Interventional Radiology

    Oncology Radiology

    Neuroradiology

    Radiological services can be broken down into three general areas in which radiology nurses can focus their professions:

    Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiology nurses within hospitals and clinics may specialize in diagnostic radiology. From basic x-rays to complex MRIs that require the administration of dye contrast, radiology nurses work to support a radiologist’s diagnostic plan while accounting for patient care, comfort, and well-being.

    Radiology nurses may focus in one or more diagnostic sub-specialization, including:

    Breast Imaging is the diagnostic imaging of the breast, breast diseases and breast conditions. It may include mammography, breast ultrasound, and breast MRI.

    Cardiovascular Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the heart and blood vessels, including the arteries and veins. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Emergency Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of traumatic injuries or conditions. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Chest Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the chest, including the heart and lungs. This may include x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.

    Gastrointestinal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the stomach, the intestines and the abdomen. This may include CT, MRI, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, and x-rays.

    Genitourinary Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the reproductive organs and urinary tract. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Head and Neck Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the head and neck in the event of spinal injury or suspected tumors. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Musculoskeletal Radiology is the diagnostic imaging of the muscles and the skeleton. This may include x-rays, MRI, CT, and ultrasound.

    Neuroradiology is the diagnostic imaging of the brain, head, neck, and spine. This may include x-rays, CT, MRI, and ultrasound.

    Nuclear Radiology is diagnostic imaging using miniscule amounts of radioactive material. This may include PET, PET/CT, and gamma imaging.

    Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

    Radiological nurses in radiation therapy perform examinations and procedures under the guidance of a radiologist oncologist. Radiological nurses assist the radiologist oncologist with the implementation of a precise radiation treatment plan. The radiology nurse may also be a valuable source of care and support for the patient regarding both the physical and emotional difficulties brought on by cancer and radiation therapy. A radiation therapy nurse works with the radiologist oncologist to deliver radiation therapy through a number of delivery methods, including external-beam radiation therapy, systemic radiation therapy, and internal radiation therapy.

    Interventional Radiology

    From decreased recovery times and decreased costs, to less pain and shorter (if any) hospital stays, interventional radiology, which uses radiological technology to perform minimally invasive interventional techniques, is revolutionizing the way many health services are delivered. Interventional radiology is often used for blood vessel procedures such as angiography, angioplasty, and stent placement; biopsy procedures; fibroid removal; and fluid and abscess drainage, just to name a few.

    Interventional radiologists often employ a team of highly skilled professionals, including nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, and physician assistants. Because of the demands on the interventional radiologist to perform clinical services, consultations, and rounds, mid-level practitioners, such as advanced practice nurses, often oversee the interventional radiology laboratory in the absence of the interventional radiologist. Nurse radiologists in an interventional radiology laboratory setting perform a number of procedures, such as central line placements, while also assisting the radiologist in more complex procedures. In addition, they perform a number of important tasks outside of the interventional laboratory, which may include:

    Acting as the first point of contact for referrals and patients

    Attending patient consultations

    Performing initial examinations and patient assessments

    Writing pre-procedure orders

    Making recommendations to the referring physician, the patient, and patient’s family under the guidance of the interventional radiologist

    Serving as a liaison between the patient and the nursing staff and referring physician

    Performing daily rounds and communicating patient progress to the medical staff and the radiologist

    Orchestrating patient discharge and making additional referrals for home care

    Performing follow-up visits

    Education

    Many nurses interested in pursuing radiology as their advanced practice specialty achieve their master’s or doctoral degree in nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner, an Adult Nurse Practitioner, or a Clinical Nurse Specialist. They may satisfy their radiology education as either part of their graduate degree program’s clinical component in which they may perform radiological services, or in a post-master’s certificate program specific to radiology. Employers seeking advanced practice radiology nurses generally require that they hold a master’s degree in nursing, an advanced practice nursing license and, often times, specialty certification.

    Some of the courses nurses pursue to achieve additional education in radiology include:

    Advanced Radiation Protection and Biology

    Advanced Radiation Physics

    Advanced Radiologic Quality Assurance

    Pathology Across Radiology Modalities

    Medical Imaging in the Digital Environment

    Case Studies in Medical Imaging

    Radiology Management

    Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Specialty Certification

    Although there is no advanced nursing certification available for radiology nurses, specialty certification through the Radiological Nursing Certification Board can be achieved to demonstrate experience and knowledge in radiological science.

    The Radiologic Nursing Certification Board, through the Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing, offers the Certified Radiology Nurse (CRN) designation. To qualify for CRN certification, applicants must:

    Hold a current, valid RN license or an international equivalent

    Possess evidence of practicing at least 2,000 hours as an RN within the three years prior to applying

    Possess evidence of at least 30 contact hours of continuing education in the field of radiology within the two years prior to applying; at least 15 of those hours must be specifically related to radiological nursing �” Acquired contact hours must be approved by any organization or educational institution that is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center Commission on Accreditation (ANCC), which is the credentialing body of the American Nurses Association

    The Certification Examination for Radiologic Nursing in Imaging can be taken either in May or October through a C-NET testing center.  It is a written examination comprised of 200 multiple-choice questions that cover the following topics:

    Administering, Monitoring, and Evaluating Therapeutic Interventions

    Teaching Patients and Families/Providing a Supportive Environment

    Providing a Safe Environment/Managing Emergency Situations

    Participating in QA/CQI Interdisciplinary Activities, and Professional Practice Activities

    Diagnostic Imaging, Fluoroscopy, and Breast Health

    CT and MRI, including PET

    Interventional Radiology

    Ultrasound/Vascular Ultrasound

    Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy

    Renewal for CRN certification is every four years, and maintenance of the certification is dependent upon maintaining an RN license and meeting specific recertification requirements.

    Resources for Radiology Nurses

    The Association for Radiologic and Imaging Nursing is a network of professionals who are committed to the development and growth of nurses in radiologic imaging.

    The Association for Vascular Access (AVA) is an association of healthcare professionals that promotes the “emerging vascular access specialty.” The AVA promotes research and professional and public education and partners with the device manufacturing community to bring about innovations in vascular access.

    The American College of Radiology is a professional membership organization made up of radiologists, medical physicists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians and allied health professionals. The organization is devoted to making imaging safe, effective, and accessible.

    The Journal of Radiology Nursing promotes patient care in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging settings.

    The Radiological Society of North America is an international society of radiologists, medical physicists, and medical professionals that hosts the largest medical meeting in the world, publishes two peer-reviewed journals, and offers educational resources.

    RadioGraphics is the journal of continuing medical education in radiology.

    Radiology is a monthly journal devoted to clinical radiology and the allied sciences.

    Salary Expectations

    Advance for NPs and PAs National Salary Report for 2011 showed that the average, full-time salary for a nurse practitioner in 2011 was $90,583, while the salary for a nurse practitioner in a hospital setting was $96,124 on average. Other examples of advanced practice nurses involved in radiologic therapeutics, intervention, and imaging included nurse practitioners working in oncology clinics, where they earned an average of $90,862, those in emergency departments where the average was $103,722, and those in surgical settings where they earned an average of $91,023 in 2011.

    Surrounding Areas In Utah

  • Radiology Nurse Murray UT 83874
  • Radiology Nurse Bear River City UT 84301
  • Radiology Nurse Teasdale UT 84773
  • Radiology Nurse Riverside UT 84334
  • Radiology Nurse Modena UT 84753
  • Radiology Nurse Helper UT 84526
  • Radiology Nurse Saint George UT 84770
  • Radiology Nurse Mountain Home UT 84051
  • Radiology Nurse Junction UT 84740
  • Radiology Nurse Leamington UT 84638
  • Wendover Information

    [ssyelp location="Wendover UT" term="schools" limit="10"]